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How to Embed Pencasts in PBWorks Wiki Pages

PBWorks is an extremely popular and powerful wiki (and more!) tool for educators, businesses, and individuals.  If you’re not familiar with wikis I suggest you view this YouTube video: Wikis in Plain English.

How to embed Livescribe pencasts in PBWorks wiki pages

Method 1: How to embed a pencast with its normal (small) dimensions.  Example

  1. Find the pencast you want on Livescribe.
  2. Click the "Embed this file" button.
  3. Select and copy the embed code to your clipboard.  Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C on Windows or Command-C on a Mac.
  4. In PBWorks – Click the PBWorks Insert Plugin – PBWorks Magic – HTML/JavaScript tool.
    • Paste the resulting embed code into the HTML/JavaScript plugin, click Preview, and press OK.
  5. Voila! When you click Save in PBWorks you should now see the pencast and right above it have a link to the pencast on Livescribe’s site.

Method 2:  How to embed a pencast with small, medium, or large dimensions.   Example

  1. Find the pencast you want on LiveScribe.
  2. Click the "Get a link to this file" button.
  3. Select and copy the link to your clipboard.  Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C on Windows or Command-C on a Mac.
  4. Refer to the post "How to Embed Larger Pencasts" and use James Socol’s Pencast Embed tool to generate the needed embed code.
  5. In PBWorks – Click the PBWorks Insert Plugin – PBWorks Magic – HTML/JavaScript tool.
  6. Voila! When you click Save in PBWorks you should now see the pencast and right above it have a link to the pencast on Livescribe’s site.

 

How to Embed Pencasts in Wikispaces Wiki Pages

Wikispaces is a very popular and powerful wiki for K-12 educators, higher ed, businesses, and non-profits.  If you’re not familiar with wikis I suggest you view this YouTube video: Wikis in Plain English.

How to embed Livescribe pencasts in Wikispaces wiki pages

Method 1: How to embed a pencast with its normal (small) dimensions.  Example

  1. Find the pencast you want on Livescribe.
  2. Click the "Embed this file" button.
  3. Select and copy the embed code to your clipboard.  Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C on Windows or Command-C on a Mac.
  4. Navigate to the desired Wikispaces page.
  5. Click Edit this Page, click the Widget button, and then click the Other HTML button.
  6. Paste the embed code on the clipboard into the HTML box and then click Preview (and then Close Preview) and/or Save.  
  7. Optional: Click on the widget and change its alignment.
  8. Click Save. 
  9. You should now see the pencast and right above it also see a clickable link to the pencast on Livescribe’s site.

Method 2:  How to embed a pencast with small, medium, or large dimensions.   Example

  1. Find the pencast you want on Livescribe.
  2. Click the "Get a link to this file" button.
  3. Select and copy the link to your clipboard.  Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-C on Windows or Command-C on a Mac.
  4. Refer to the post "How to Embed Larger Pencasts" and use James Socol’s Pencast Embed tool to generate the needed embed code.
  5. Navigate to the desired Wikispaces page.
  6. Click Edit this Page, click the Widget button, and then click the Other HTML button.
  7. Paste the embed code on the clipboard into the HTML box, then click Preview (and then Close Preview) and/or click the Save button.  
  8. Optional: Click on the widget and change its alignment.
  9. Click Save. 
  10. You should now see the pencast and right above it also see a clickable link to the pencast on Livescribe’s site.

Please leave a comment if this helps you or if you have any suggestions about how to improve on these directions.  Thanks!  — Tim F

 

How to Use Smartpens with Interactive Whiteboards

Here are some best practices for using Livescribe smartpens in classrooms with interactive whiteboards:

  1. Student note taking with audio recording and work product creation (From Holly De Leon, Livescribe: VP Sales, K-12)

    The basic way we describe integration with interactive whiteboards is that students still have to process the information, no matter if they are receiving instruction from a teacher or through a lesson presented on a whiteboard – the student has to take it in visually and auditorally, integrate the information, and try to get something written to help the retention process.  They can do that with a smartpen and can capture notes and audio from their teacher’s instruction, videos projected onto whiteboard, and internet content being shown on the whiteboard.  

    Then when the child is asked to produce a work product (written essay, math problem, art creation) they can again use a smartpen and notebook to create their work product.  Then their teacher can dock the smartpen and then share & project a pencast of work on whiteboard as an example of the lesson just presented.  The student could give a verbal explanation of a battle in the Civil War that was just explored using whiteboard tools; they could show a different way of charting a series of numbers in a math equation.  The point is the interactive whiteboard is a great way to provide instruction and interest, but the actual processing of information and integrating it for retention can be greatly enhanced with the smartpen.

  2. Note taking with audio recording shared as a pencast (From Tim Fahlberg, Livescribe – Wisconsin)

    Ask a student who already takes excellent notes to record even better notes with audio using a smartpen.  Make sure they write a heading with the class name, lesson name, date, and start time at the top of the page (or these can also be added after class).

    After class the teacher (or a student/parent aide) docks the smartpen, quickly creates a pencast from the notes, and then shares it using a wiki, blog, or website.  Pencasts can also be shared via email.  

    This way students and their parents or tutors can access notes quickly and get much more out of them since they can listen to the teacher’s instruction or classroom discussions while watching the ink written by the note taker appear like magic.  And then if students who were absent also had their own smartpens they could use these to do and share some of their homework digitally back with their teacher.

    Imagine being a student who is absent from school (or their parent) and being able to watch & listen to the notes on the same day that class(es) were missed!?

  3. Recording audio and sharing as a podcast

    Ink notes with audio can be recorded (above) or audio only can be recorded (using the method shared in this blog post/video: How to Quickly Record …).  

    Audio only can then be shared by locating the audio file in the Livescribe Desktop (using the Audio tab) and then clicking the Upload button.

    Audio can be exported in various formats and shared through iTunes or other sites.  

     

  4. Note taking with audio using handouts

    This idea is similar to adding notes and audio to PowerPoint slides printed on Livescribe dot paper (see How to Add Ink and Audio to PowerPoint Notes)..  Basically the idea is that if a teacher has a lesson already prepared using their IWB software then the teacher (or student) could print out the slides/pages from it onto Livescribe dot paper and then add their notes and record audio along with it.  And then students, parents, or a tutor could later touch their smartpen to their ink and be able to replay everything that was recorded while the writing originally took place. 

    Students who really struggle with taking legible notes (students with dysgraphia, etc) can either write whatever notes they can or simple make marks (dots, asterisks, exclamation points) when they here something really critical that they’d like to easily find and listen to later again.
          

 

 

How to Add Ink & Audio to PowerPoint Handouts

Here are 3 different ways to add ink & audio recording to PowerPoint Handouts

  1. Print or copy PowerPoint handouts onto large (8 1/2" x 11") Livescribe dot paper carefully torn from a notebook.  Then take notes with audio recording turned on with your smartpen and the dot paper.
     
  2. Take existing PowerPoint handouts printed on regular paper and add Livescribe "talking dot labels or shapes" to them (see "How to Create Talking Dot Shapes & Labels). Start recording and then make a mark on them using the Record control from any Livescribe notebook page (you can even cut these out and paste them onto a 3" x 5" card or something similar).  The talking dot shape or label you use won’t have enough space for taking written notes but by tapping on the dot or mark you made later you’ll be able to hear the audio and add additional written notes to your PowerPoint handout.
     
  3. Cut up PowerPoint handouts that were already printed on plain paper and use a stapler or glue stick to affix them to Livescribe dot paper from a large notebook.  Then take notes to the right of the slides while recording audio. 

How to Create Talking Dot Shapes & Labels

Talking Dot Shapes               Talking Dot Labels

Talking Dot Shapes

Did you know that you can add your voice (or sounds) to any document or object by adding your voice (or sound) to small Livescribe dot paper shapes (rectangles, etc) and then taping/gluing them to document or other object?  

This idea is used in multiple ways in our series 12 Ways Educators & Students are Using the Pen Today.

The YouTube video below shows how this method can be used to create a reusable talking test from a plain paper test thus allowing a student with an IEP accommodation to listen independently to the test at their own pace and allowing an adult to read the test once while recording it and use their valuable time to do something more productive.

                        Click on image below to open YouTube video in a new tab/window.
                     

Tips:

  1. Make talking dots in the center of a piece of Livescribe dot paper that has minimum dimensions of at least 1/2" x 1/2" (about 1.3 cm x 1.3 cm).
  2. After adding the talking dot shapes to the test protect it by sliding it into a protective plastic sheet protector. The smartpen will be be able to see the talking dots through the plastic.
  3. If you need to create a test that can be listened to by more than one student at a time then consider creating a pencast of it and sharing it online or export the recordings of the questions from the Livescribe Desktop to an mp3 player, iPod, etc.


Talking Dot Labels

Since you can print your own Livescribe dot paper then you can print these same "talking dots" to sheets of labels and then add these labels to any object … say a test that you want to add your voice to.

The YouTube video below shows how this can be done to make a plain paper test talk thus allowing a student with an IEP accommodation to listen independently to the test at their own pace. 

               Click on image below to open YouTube video in a new tab/window.

Tips:

  1. You can buy sheets of rectangular labels at any office supply store or many other stores.  Round labels are typically a special order item.  I bought the ones shown in this video at www.labelsbythesheet.com
  2. Make talking dots in the center of labels that have minimum dimensions of at least 1/2" x 1/2" (about 1.3 cm x 1.3 cm).
  3. After adding talking dot labels to a document protect it by sliding it into a protective plastic sheet protector.  The smartpen will be be able to see the talking dots through the plastic.
  4. If you need to create a test that can be listened to by more than one student at a time then consider creating a pencast of it and sharing it online or export the recordings of the questions from the Livescribe Desktop to an mp3 player, iPod, etc. (Video showing this coming soon)

Pencasting to Prepare for the LSAT

If you are preparing for the LSAT—the Law School Admission Test—then you know that understanding the reasoning underlying the test questions is key to doing well on the exam.  If you are looking for that type of insight, then you’ll want to check out this site: The Zen of 180 – Outfox the LSAT.  The title is a reference to the highest possible scaled score on the LSAT, a 180.  What brought me to the site is its extraordinary use of Livescribe pencasts. 

It turns out that the site creator, Mr. Bennett, is a Teach For America corps member and an admitted student to Harvard Law School’s class of 2013.  His specialty is breaking down the LSAT into it’s smallest chunks, called task standards like in traditional K-12 education, and allowing readers to actually watch him answer the notoriously tricky analytical reasoning section, also known as logic games.

Mr. Bennett’s shares his thinking and reasoning out loud as he solves Analytical Reasoning problems from publicly released LSAT questions.  Here’s an example of a pencast designed to improve your strategy in attacking an analytical reasoning game (it goes along with a released problem from the sample October 1996 LSAT):

 

In Mr. Bennett’s own words, "If you take one thing away from this blog, I want you to understand that what the LSAT measures—the ability to decode and comprehend text and then apply logical and analytical reasoning—can be learned. In statistics language, there is a positive correlation between the quality of test preparation and LSAT score." 

Whether or not you are studying for the LSAT, Mr. Bennett’s use of pencasting showcases how any educator can utilize the Pulse smartpen to create study guides or teach step-by-step problems more effectively. Students are able to revisit the educator’s lecture at any time to hear the verbal explanation and see the problem worked out step by step as if the educator was sitting there right beside them. 

Do you have a great story of how you are using pencasts in your school or district? Shoot us an email a sjohnson@livescribe.com.

Categories: LSAT Review Tags:

SmartMap Application for the Livescribe Smartpen – An interactive zoo map

Wow! I just received an extraordinary email with a link to this YouTube video
(Video will open in a new window/tab):

Note: If you cannot view YouTube educational videos like this at your school then please leave a comment below and I’ll ask if I can share the video on Screencast.com.

I think you’ll agree that SmartMap is exceptional. But it gets even better. SmartMap’s creator, Jacky Nguyen, wrote me to say that he “would love to share the whole source-code as open-source software to other developers, many of which might find it useful.” Isn’t that fantastic news?! I know that it’s going to inspire me to finally try my hand at creating an application and that it will help encourage and inspire many others to do the same.

I couldn’t agree more with Jacky’s comments:

I have developed a small application named SmartMap that can be useful to:
- Show others how capable this pen can be
- Give a working proof of concept how we can actually use the SmartPen with maps

On YouTube Jacky also shares:

The app utilizes all available features of the pen including:
- Hand-writing recognition
- Local storage
- Voice
- LCD Display
- PenTip events handling

I’ll share more later as Jacky and I have a thread about all of this.

Well done Jacky! — Tim

Categories: Create an Interactive Map, Maps Tags:

How Assistive Technologies like the Smartpen and DNS enable (and inspire!) – Lori Katz’s story

Lori Katz, a Learning Specialist from the Joseph Sharp Elementary School in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, USA, has a very unique and compelling story that relates to the Livescribe Smartpen.  She recently shared her inspirational experiences and insights with Steve Lubetkin of Lubetkin Communications/Professional Podcasts.

Lori shares about how tools like the Livescribe Smartpen and DNS – Nuance’s Dragon Naturally Speaking have helped her meet the challenges of early onset Parkinson’s disease and how the Smartpen helps her help the students she serves in many ways (assessing reading fluency, etc).

Steve has masterfully produced his interview with Lori along with a demonstration of the Smartpen and graciously shared them in an extraordinary CompuSchmooze post/podcast:  “New technologies are revolutionizing life for disabled people”.

The image below also links to this post/podcast:

To read the complete CompuSchmooze article, visit the Jewish Community Voice of Southern New Jersey website and read Steve’s post “New technologies are revolutionizing life for disabled people.”

Stay tuned for more as Lori is fully of great ideas for the Smartpen — Especially related to reading and reading fluency.  She and I have begun work on a Reading Fluency/Running Records project which we see complementing the work that Dr. Andrew Van Schaack has already done (see Reading and Research Support).




Categories: Parkinson's Disease, Reading Tags:

Talking Flash Cards (English-Spanish)

I had a new idea after creating the Interactive (Science) Study Guide and Talking test. Basically I thought that it would be possible to cut out little rectangles or squares from Livescribe paper and use them to create talking flash cards (or talking pages in books, objects in a classroom, words on word wall, etc). I’ll start with talking flash cards made with 3″ x 5″ cards and 1/2″ x 1/2″ Livescribe “talking squares.”

If you’re an ELL/ESL/World Languages teacher you might also consider the essay by Emily Wartinbee here: EFL and ESL: Using the Smartpen to Enhance the Productivity and Effectiveness of ESL Instruction

YouTube version of video (new window): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cvqus9cc1a8

Screencast.com version (new window) – with link to downloadable version of video: http://www.screencast.com/t/OTZhM2JjOD

I’d sure value your feedback on this idea. I don’t know – Do students studying languages even use flashcards anymore?

——————-
Credits:

I used an AVerMedia 355AF document camera for imaging, Snagit to create the image above, and JingPro* to record the video, and Camtasia Studio** (Mac and Windows versions now available) to edit and produce the video to mp4 format. Editing was minimal — I mainly increased the volume level especially for the parts of the demo when I was playing audio through the Smartpen since I was recording using a boom microphone that didn’t do a great job picking up the sound from it.

*JingPro is from TechSmith.  It’s like Jing (free) on steroids and well worth $14.95 per year.  You can connect Jing, JingPro, or Camtasia Studio (or Camtasia:mac) to a free 2 GB Screencast.com account (or a Pro account with a lot more space and bandwidth).  Jing and JingPro do both screen capturing and screen recording (5 minute limit).

**Camtasia Studio (for Windows) and Camtasia: mac are from TechSmith.  When you need more than 5 minute recordings, PowerPoint recording, editing, or production to a myriad of formats you’ll want Camtasia or Camtasia Relay.

How to use Flick and Scrub

The following was copied from the Livescribe blog post
New Smartpen Features: Quick Launch and Flick & Scrub

How to use Flick and Scrub:

  1. Navigate to a list of vertical menu items, such as Main Menu or one of its submenus, such as Applications or Settings.
  2. Flip to a new piece of dot paper. Press the tip of your smartpen down for one-half (1/2) second.
  3. Wait until you hear a short beep, then without lifting your smartpen tip off the paper, draw a horizontal or vertical line.
  4. Your smartpen will automatically recognize this line as a Flick and Scrub control.
  5. Retrace the line to scroll through the menu items or app display text. The display text will scroll either up and down (for vertical controls) or left and right (for horizontal controls), depending on the direction in which you drew the control.

TIP: After you have created a Flick and Scrub control, you can use it at any time for scrolling. Just trace over the line to activate it (just like how you can re-use a hand-drawn Nav Plus after creating it.

The image below links to the original blog post which has a video
showing flick and scrub (the bottom video) and quick launch (top video).

Categories: Use Flick and Scrub Tags: