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Archive for the ‘Reading’ Category

Education Example: Running Record/Fluency Test

Education Example: Running Record/Fluency (Print post) In this example, the diagnostician printed the fluency passage onto dot paper so that the students actual reading of the passage could be captured. Using this method of capture, not only do you provide a means of checking accuracy of response, but also you also can allow the student to participate in self monitoring of reading fluency. You are also able to archive the reading to maintain a record of the students progress.  
Presentation by Holly De Leon, Vice President Sales, K-12, Livescribe.

From "12 Ways Educators and Students Are Using the Pen Today"

Categories: Fluency and Running Records Tags:

Education Example: Talking Word Wall

Many students need help in remembering the words on the word wall and many of those students need audio reinforcement of the word multiple times. In this example, the teacher records the words using the dot paper and the smartpen, then cuts out the dots and attaches them to the words on the word wall. The smartpen is attached to the bulletin board and the student can use the pen to touch the audio dot to get help with the word

Presentation by Holly De Leon, Vice President Sales, K-12, Livescribe.

From "12 Ways Educators and Students Are Using the Pen Today"

Categories: Talking Word Wall Tags:

Education Example: Oral Book Report

Using the printable dot paper function in the Livescribe desktop application, an educator at the Runanga School in New Zealand was able to print the dot paper pattern on to blank labels to create audio labels, which can be attached to virtually anything. Here is an example of an oral book review students attach an audio label in books they have read with a review of the book, what they thought about it, what they liked/disliked about the book.

Presentation by Holly De Leon, Vice President Sales, K-12, Livescribe.

From "12 Ways Educators and Students Are Using the Pen Today"

Categories: Oral Book Report Tags:

How Assistive Technologies like the Smartpen and DNS enable (and inspire!) – Lori Katz’s story

Lori Katz, a Learning Specialist from the Joseph Sharp Elementary School in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, USA, has a very unique and compelling story that relates to the Livescribe Smartpen.  She recently shared her inspirational experiences and insights with Steve Lubetkin of Lubetkin Communications/Professional Podcasts.

Lori shares about how tools like the Livescribe Smartpen and DNS – Nuance’s Dragon Naturally Speaking have helped her meet the challenges of early onset Parkinson’s disease and how the Smartpen helps her help the students she serves in many ways (assessing reading fluency, etc).

Steve has masterfully produced his interview with Lori along with a demonstration of the Smartpen and graciously shared them in an extraordinary CompuSchmooze post/podcast:  “New technologies are revolutionizing life for disabled people”.

The image below also links to this post/podcast:

To read the complete CompuSchmooze article, visit the Jewish Community Voice of Southern New Jersey website and read Steve’s post “New technologies are revolutionizing life for disabled people.”

Stay tuned for more as Lori is fully of great ideas for the Smartpen — Especially related to reading and reading fluency.  She and I have begun work on a Reading Fluency/Running Records project which we see complementing the work that Dr. Andrew Van Schaack has already done (see Reading and Research Support).




Categories: Parkinson's Disease, Reading Tags:

Livescribe – Reading – Part 3 – Read Along Exercise

Reading – Part 3 – Read-Along Exercise

This is the third of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

Fluency Training – Struggling readers could also benefit from a Read-Along exercise.

How to demonstrate this

  1. Print a page from a reading book onto Livescribe dot paper as you did for the 60-Second Time Reading activity above.
  2. But in this case, draw a speaker icon next to the first word of each paragraph.
  3. Tap the Record button and then write a check mark next to the speaker icon.
  4. Read the entire paragraph at a normal pace.
  5. When the speaker reaches the end of the paragraph tap the Stop button.
  6. For the demonstration, ask a student to tap on the check mark next to the speaker icon to begin the playback.
  7. Ask the student to read along with the speaker.

IMPORTANT

  1. Have the Livescribe notebook open next to you (or cut and paste the Paper Replay controls onto the bottom of the page in the book).
  2. Tell the student that they can speed up or slow down the playback of the audio.
    1. Every tap of the speed-up button increases the playback speed by 20%.
    2. Tapping it five times increases the playback speed to a maximum of 200%.
    3. Every tap of the slow-down button decreases the playback speed by 10%.
    4. Tapping it five times decreases the playback speed to a minimum of 50%.

Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Categories: Read Along Exercise, Reading Tags:

Livescribe – Reading – Part 2 – Fluency and Running Records

Reading – Part 2 – How to create a fluency test (running record)

This is the second of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

The video below provides a description and demonstration of a reading fluency exercise (the exercise starts at about 2:15).

YouTube version of video (new window): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMXZmxJ7Zew

Screencast.com version (new window): http://www.screencast.com/t/N2YzMTdkNWY

Steps:  Taken from the free Teaching Strategy Guide “Monitoring Student Progress: using Daily Fluency Records to Monitor Student Progress“  This is part of the much larger Livescribe’s Teaching Strategy Guide available along with professional development from a Livescribe Educational Representative.

  1. Put some Livescribe paper (from an 8 1/2″ x 11″ notebook) into a photocopier or printer and then print a page from a reading book onto it.
  2. Tap the Record button and ask the student to begin reading.
  3. Circle any errors that they make.
  4. When the Smartpen indicates that they have read for 60 seconds, draw a vertical line after the last word they spoke, call stop, and then tap the Stop button.
  5. Add up the number of words they read and subtract the number of words they read incorrectly. This is their score.
  6. You can track their reading speed over time to chart their progress.
  7. Teachers can also save the reading sheets and analyze progress over time. They can also share readings as audio (mp3 or iPod format) with parents or students privately.

Here is a link that provides more information about individual and paired fluency exercises as well as scholarly references that provide empirical support for this approach:      http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings


Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Livescribe – Reading – Part 1 – Assessment

Reading – Part 1 – 60-Second Timed Reading Assessment

This is the first of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

Please watch the video below – it provides a description and demonstration of a reading fluency exercise (the exercise starts at about 2:15).

Although this might, at first glance, appear to be an exercise suited only for beginning readers, it is suitable for beginning or intermediate second language learners as well.

Key parts of Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s analysis:

  1. Effective teachers apply systematic classroom-based instructional assessment to monitor student progress in order to modify instruction to meet individual student needs.
  2. One common example is reading fluency.  Reading fluency is frequently measured by counting the number of words a child can read correctly in 1 minute. Because errors take time, measuring fluency correct words per minutes provides an objective measure of reading development.
  3. Most educational researchers agree that 1 minute timed readings are a sensitive, reliable, and valid measure of reading proficiency.
  4. Another benefit of this form of assessment compares them with other reading measures is that it’s easy and efficient for teachers.
  5. A Livescribe Pulse Smartpen addresses many of the limitations of the conventional approach to collection, analysis, and reporting of fluency data. For example, in a conventional approach, teachers only retain only a paper record. With a Smartpen the teacher’s handwritten marks are linked with an audio recording of the child.
  6. With a Smartpen teachers can go back and listen to the recording as many times as necessary to insure accurate scoring and to examine more carefully the types of errors that were made.
  7. With a Smartpen teachers can also play back audio recordings for their supervisor or the child’s parents. They can also examine recordings collected over a long period of time to more authentically examine a child’s reading development.
  8. Most important all of these benefits are realized without requiring the teacher to change an established and accepted protocol.

In Part 2 we’ll look at how to create a fluency test (running record)


Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Categories: Assessment, Reading Tags:

Sharing student reading at parent-teacher conferences

And yet another great idea shared by a principal from Arizona who shares how her school is using the Livescribe Pulse smartpen.

Sharing student reading at parent-teacher conferences

Using a Livescribe Pulse Smartpen and Livescribe notebook the teacher writes a student’s name and records the student reading a grade-level passage.  And then, at the next parent-teacher conference the teacher plays the reading so that the parents get a very clear view of their child’s reading skills.

The same format has been used for numerous assessments and antidotal [anecdotal?] recordings to share with the parents. After the teacher conferences with parents, the teacher can upload the information* so that the parents have a record of it for themselves.

Additional notes by Tim Fahlberg:
*Teachers can upload and share recordings in several ways:

  1. As a pencast that’s shared privately.  Sharing privately allows teachers to send invitation to parents to view/listen to their child’s reading aloud and makes it so that only parents can listen to their child reading aloud on the internet.
  2. Advanced method:  Teachers can use the Livescribe Desktop software to export audio to 2 formats (mp3 and iTunes mp4 formats) and share these privately on the internet or perhaps put them on parents USB memory drives that they bring to parent-teacher conferences.