Archive

Archive for October, 2009

Livescribe Notetaking Service at U of R

The University of Rochester now offers notetaking using Livescribe smartpens and notebooks as an accommodation.

Read more:  http://www.rochester.edu/college/cetl/livescribe.html

Hopefully many more colleges as well as K-12 schools will soon offer notetaking service this way as well perhaps modeling their program after the U of Rs since they’ve created helpful documents (e.g., Lecture Recording Conditions) which should shorten the amount of work other programs need to do to offer notetaking using Livescribe technology.

From their site:

We are pleased to inform you of the technologically advanced note-taking system Learning Assistance Services (LAS) will be providing beginning Fall 2009. Most students who receive notes as an accommodation will now be provided with a Pulse Smartpen and set of four notebooks.

The Pulse Smartpen is relatively new technology that links audio (class lectures) to what students write (their notes). Students will walk out of each class session with a complete audio recording, and will have the option to play back their lectures at differing speeds, download their notes online, jump ahead in their notes, bookmark special pages, and so much more.

Please use the links below to learn more about this new service.

INFORMATION FOR INSTRUCTORS:

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS:




Categories: Note Taking Service, Note taking Tags:

Sharing student reading at parent-teacher conferences

And yet another great idea shared by a principal from Arizona who shares how her school is using the Livescribe Pulse smartpen.

Sharing student reading at parent-teacher conferences

Using a Livescribe Pulse Smartpen and Livescribe notebook the teacher writes a student’s name and records the student reading a grade-level passage.  And then, at the next parent-teacher conference the teacher plays the reading so that the parents get a very clear view of their child’s reading skills.

The same format has been used for numerous assessments and antidotal [anecdotal?] recordings to share with the parents. After the teacher conferences with parents, the teacher can upload the information* so that the parents have a record of it for themselves.

Additional notes by Tim Fahlberg:
*Teachers can upload and share recordings in several ways:

  1. As a pencast that’s shared privately.  Sharing privately allows teachers to send invitation to parents to view/listen to their child’s reading aloud and makes it so that only parents can listen to their child reading aloud on the internet.
  2. Advanced method:  Teachers can use the Livescribe Desktop software to export audio to 2 formats (mp3 and iTunes mp4 formats) and share these privately on the internet or perhaps put them on parents USB memory drives that they bring to parent-teacher conferences.




Speech recording and evaluation using the Livescribe smartpen

Another great idea shared by a principal from Arizona who shares how her school is using the Livescribe Pulse smartpen.

School speech therapist:

When there is a student whom the teacher has concerns about, they use the Pulse smartpen to record a conversation between the child and themself.  Then the pen and notebook goes to the speech therapist and, when they have time, they can listen to the conversation and then use this conversation to determine if they would like to get parental permission to evaluate the child for speech services.




Create talking sub plans with the Livescribe smartpen

Another great idea shared by a principal from Arizona who shares how her school is using the Livescribe Pulse smartpen.

Helping substitutes have the most success:

While lesson plans will be available in print form, details can be recorded by the Pulse smartpen.

When the substitute sets the pen to playback and touches the word “science,” they will hear, “Science materials are in the large blue box.  Each student will need two large discs and one small straw…”

Using this method can reduce or eliminate the time or need for typing out time consuming details that would not normally be included in lesson plans.

Additional comment by Tim Fahlberg:
If teachers need to create sub plans away from school they can use their smartpens to record them (with or without voice explanations) and share them through email as pdfs (for printing) or as talking sub plans (through pencasts).

Teachers can also share portions of sub plans or lessons publicly so that subs, parents, or students can watch and listen to them at school, home or work.  To learn how to do this see
Livescribe – How to Create and Share a Pencast (Mathcast)




Theater, opera, music and the Livescribe

The following idea comes from a principal in Arizona who shares how her school is using the Livescribe Pulse smartpen.

Idea: Theater (or opera with my class in this case):  Students will be writing an opera. The opera artist will play the music as students sing their lines. Lyrics are likely to be written and given to me, and perhaps sheet music to go along with it.   Since I cannot read sheet music, I can write the name of the student, record that student practicing his/her lines with the musical accompaniment in opera class, then we can practice it at any time back in classroom I can upload it and send each students’ lines with accompaniment to his/her parents.




Categories: Theater, Music, and Opera Tags:

How to Share Livescribe Pencasts on YouTube

Goal: Start with a Livescribe pencast and share it on YouTube

Example: Supply and Demand Chart by Josh Fassl

Original pencast: Supply and Demand Chart

brought to you by Livescribe

YouTube video of the same pencast (I used method #3 below)

Version only showing writing with voice:

Since it’s not currently (as of 10/25/2009) possible to create a screencast from the Livescribe Desktop or from Livescribe Online the following methods are recommended for converting Livescribe pencasts to screencasts.

Method 1: Record small, medium, or large version of pencast* to mp4 format using JingPro** and share using YouTube. Read more… How to Share Livescribe Pencasts on YouTube

Categories: Share pencasts on YouTube, YouTube Tags:

How to Convert Livescribe Pencasts to Screencasts

Goal: Start with a Livescribe pencast and end up with a YouTube or Screencast.com video

Example:

Original: Supply and Demand Chart

brought to you by Livescribe

YouTube  video of the same pencast (I used method #4 below)

Since it’s not currently (as of 10/25/2009) possible to create a screencast from the Livescribe Desktop or from Livescribe Online the following methods are recommended for converting Livescribe phttp://www.edlivescribe.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=210&message=1encasts to screencasts.

Method 1: Record small, medium, or large version of pencast* using Jing** and share on Screencast.com**.  Share embedded (or linked) videos on blogs, wikis, Moodle, web pages, or through email (links)

Pros: Uses two free tools.
Cons: Limited to 5 minute recordings.
More info below.

Method 2: Record small, medium, or large version of pencast* to mp4 format using JingPro** and share using YouTube and/or Screencast.com**.
Share embedded (or linked) videos on blogs, wikis, Moodle, web pages, or through email (links
Pros: Videos can be uploaded directly to either YouTube or Screencast.com from JingPro.
Cons: JingPro costs $14.95 per year
More info below.

Method 3: Record small, medium, or large version of pencast* using Camtasia Recorder** and edit/produce using Camtasia Studio** or Camtasia:Mac** to record, produce, and share on YouTube, Screencast.com**.  Share embedded (or linked) videos on blogs, wikis, Moodle, web pages, or through email (links
Pros: Able to share pencasts in a myriad of formats (iTunes/iPod, web, DVD, web)
Cons: Camtasia Studio has a learning curve and costs about $200.  So I always encourage people to start with Jing & JingPro and then “graduate” to Camtasia Studio (or Camtasia:Mac) when they need to record more than 5 minute screencasts, need to edit, etc.
More info below.

Method 4:  Play back pencast full screen and record using Camtasia Recorder**.  Edit/produce using Camtasia Studio** or Camtasia:Mac** to record, produce, and share on YouTube, Screencast.com. Suggestions for editing: a) crop the resulting video (using a Zoom and Pan frame), b) boost the audio level several times and c) remove noise.  Then share using Screencast.com** (multiple formats) or produce to mp4 format and upload the resulting video to YouTube.  Crop video to have a 16 x 9 aspect ratio if uploading to YouTube.

* How to embed medium and large versions of pencasts: Although it may be possibly to record pencasts that are playing back in full-screen mode it seems much easier to record them when they are simply embedded in blogs, web, or wiki pages.   But because the standard size of pencasts is so small you’ll likely want to use James Socol’s Pencast Embed tool to enlarge to medium or large sized pencasts.  Then embed them and record them.

** Jing, JingPro, Camtasia Studio, Camtasia:MacScreencast.com are all products or services of TechSmith.




Lego Robot plays the “Livescribe piano”

Who would’ve thunk that you could program a Lego Mindstorms robot to play a Livescribe piano?

Apparently the programming only required about 1.5 hours to accomplish.  Wow!  Well done!

This link comes from my dear friend and colleague Graeme from Australia.   Graeme, Tim’s math professor sister Linda, and Tim collaborated on this mathcasts article and many other projects.  Thanks Graeme!