Archive

Archive for December, 2009

How to Add the Date and Time on an Echo smartpen

Watch this video and then answer the question at the end of it: [scormcloud.training:4d12bace3c36a]

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SCORM Test

[scormcloud.training:4d128dce7e89b]

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Livescribe-Enabled Interactive Study Guide

It’s incredibly easy to add Livescribe Sound Stickers to make a study guide interactive with voice recordings.

Or you can print the study guide onto Livescribe paper and make it interactive.  Just carefully tear out an 8 1/2″ x 11″ page from a large Livescribe notebook and run it though your computer printer or copier machine to add the study guide to the dot paper.  Then add check marks, dots or letters that speak, spell, or describe what’s on the study guide.  You’ll then be able to study a new way using a talking study guide.

The YouTube video below (link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3RwtcpQYso ) shows one way to do this.

Here’s the downloadable pdf used for this activity: Biology – Skeletal System & Bones of Human Body – v2
(Note: Print page 1 on 8 1/2″  x 11″ dot paper, print pages 2 and 3 on plain paper)

Please let me know if YouTube is blocked at your school and I’ll add the video another way.




LD Podcast with Dr. Andrew Van Schaack

Whitney S. Hoffman has an extraordinary blog, LD Podcast, which “is a weekly podcast about all aspects of learning disabilities and kids who struggle in school.”   Read more on LD Podcast’s About page.

You can listen to two very thought-provoking and informative podcasts by Ms. Hoffman and Dr. Andrew Van Schaack (Livescribe Senior Science Advisor and Professor at Vanderbilt University).

From LD Podcast:

The first part of our interview [Episode 95] focuses on using technology in education and what it can and cannot accomplish;

the second half [Episode 96] discusses the Livescribe Pulse Smartpen in more detail, including what kind of mental load notetaking has on the brain, how fast we can process information, the research data about why we take notes in the first place, and how we should be using them, and we talk about how capturing information is fundamentally useless without access.

Andy also shares some exciting news about an upcoming feature that will allow Livescribe Smartpen users to print documents on Livescribe paper, record voice comments and ink annotations using a Smartpen, sync up their Smartpen to the Livescribe Desktop and then upload and interact with a very special pencast in which you can see the underlying document and be able to interact with it by replaying the voice comments and ink annotations.  Stay tuned!



Livescribe – Reading – Part 3 – Read Along Exercise

Reading – Part 3 – Read-Along Exercise

This is the third of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

Fluency Training – Struggling readers could also benefit from a Read-Along exercise.

How to demonstrate this

  1. Print a page from a reading book onto Livescribe dot paper as you did for the 60-Second Time Reading activity above.
  2. But in this case, draw a speaker icon next to the first word of each paragraph.
  3. Tap the Record button and then write a check mark next to the speaker icon.
  4. Read the entire paragraph at a normal pace.
  5. When the speaker reaches the end of the paragraph tap the Stop button.
  6. For the demonstration, ask a student to tap on the check mark next to the speaker icon to begin the playback.
  7. Ask the student to read along with the speaker.

IMPORTANT

  1. Have the Livescribe notebook open next to you (or cut and paste the Paper Replay controls onto the bottom of the page in the book).
  2. Tell the student that they can speed up or slow down the playback of the audio.
    1. Every tap of the speed-up button increases the playback speed by 20%.
    2. Tapping it five times increases the playback speed to a maximum of 200%.
    3. Every tap of the slow-down button decreases the playback speed by 10%.
    4. Tapping it five times decreases the playback speed to a minimum of 50%.

Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Categories: Read Along Exercise, Reading Tags:

Livescribe – Reading – Part 2 – Fluency and Running Records

Reading – Part 2 – How to create a fluency test (running record)

This is the second of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

The video below provides a description and demonstration of a reading fluency exercise (the exercise starts at about 2:15).

YouTube version of video (new window): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMXZmxJ7Zew

Screencast.com version (new window): http://www.screencast.com/t/N2YzMTdkNWY

Steps:  Taken from the free Teaching Strategy Guide “Monitoring Student Progress: using Daily Fluency Records to Monitor Student Progress“  This is part of the much larger Livescribe’s Teaching Strategy Guide available along with professional development from a Livescribe Educational Representative.

  1. Put some Livescribe paper (from an 8 1/2″ x 11″ notebook) into a photocopier or printer and then print a page from a reading book onto it.
  2. Tap the Record button and ask the student to begin reading.
  3. Circle any errors that they make.
  4. When the Smartpen indicates that they have read for 60 seconds, draw a vertical line after the last word they spoke, call stop, and then tap the Stop button.
  5. Add up the number of words they read and subtract the number of words they read incorrectly. This is their score.
  6. You can track their reading speed over time to chart their progress.
  7. Teachers can also save the reading sheets and analyze progress over time. They can also share readings as audio (mp3 or iPod format) with parents or students privately.

Here is a link that provides more information about individual and paired fluency exercises as well as scholarly references that provide empirical support for this approach:      http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings


Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Livescribe – Reading – Part 1 – Assessment

Reading – Part 1 – 60-Second Timed Reading Assessment

This is the first of three suggestions plus a description of the unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen from Dr. Andy Van Schaack, Vanderbilit University.

Please watch the video below – it provides a description and demonstration of a reading fluency exercise (the exercise starts at about 2:15).

Although this might, at first glance, appear to be an exercise suited only for beginning readers, it is suitable for beginning or intermediate second language learners as well.

Key parts of Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s analysis:

  1. Effective teachers apply systematic classroom-based instructional assessment to monitor student progress in order to modify instruction to meet individual student needs.
  2. One common example is reading fluency.  Reading fluency is frequently measured by counting the number of words a child can read correctly in 1 minute. Because errors take time, measuring fluency correct words per minutes provides an objective measure of reading development.
  3. Most educational researchers agree that 1 minute timed readings are a sensitive, reliable, and valid measure of reading proficiency.
  4. Another benefit of this form of assessment compares them with other reading measures is that it’s easy and efficient for teachers.
  5. A Livescribe Pulse Smartpen addresses many of the limitations of the conventional approach to collection, analysis, and reporting of fluency data. For example, in a conventional approach, teachers only retain only a paper record. With a Smartpen the teacher’s handwritten marks are linked with an audio recording of the child.
  6. With a Smartpen teachers can go back and listen to the recording as many times as necessary to insure accurate scoring and to examine more carefully the types of errors that were made.
  7. With a Smartpen teachers can also play back audio recordings for their supervisor or the child’s parents. They can also examine recordings collected over a long period of time to more authentically examine a child’s reading development.
  8. Most important all of these benefits are realized without requiring the teacher to change an established and accepted protocol.

In Part 2 we’ll look at how to create a fluency test (running record)


Research Support

  1. An excellent paper that provides research support AND specific strategies to implement a repeated reading program: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/timed_repeated_readings
  2. Dr. Andrew Van Schaack’s “Livescribe K–12 Research Support” includes a section on Reading Fluency and running records.

Unique abilities of the Livescribe Smartpen

The Livescribe smartpen is unique in its abilities *out of the box* to support read-along activities by varying the speed of the model reader.  This has been the weakness of previous read-along programs in the past.  Either the narrator was too fast, and the novice reader could not keep up, or the narrator was too slow, and the intermediate or advanced reader was held back, making the exercise pointless.




Categories: Assessment, Reading Tags:

Livescribe – Notetaking – Research, pencasts, more

The very first section of  “Livescribe in K-12 Education: Research Support” by Dr. Andrew Van Schaack is about notetaking, pencasts, etc.

This 7 page pdf contains just the notetaking section: Livescribe K-12 Research Support – Notetaking.pdf

One of the key pieces of this section is the following chart:

You can listen to 2 podcasts on Whitney S. Hoffman’s wonderful LD Podcast blog in which Whitney & Andy talk about this and much more:  Episode 95 and Episode 96.

Andy’s entire 31 page research paper is linked to from this post: Livescribe in K-12 Education …